CEMENTIFYING FIBROMA PDF

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract Central cementifying fibroma is a bony tumor, which is believed to be derived from the cells of the periodontal ligament. Central cemento-ossifying fibroma behaves like, a benign bone neoplasm. This bone tumor consists of highly cellular, fibrous tissue that contains varying amounts of calcified tissue resembling bone, cementum, or both. Central cemento-ossifying fibromas of the mandible are common; however, they are rare in the maxilla region. This tumor is most frequent between 35 and 40 years of ages.

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Cemento-ossifying fibroma of the mandible A clinicopathological report Tapas K. E-mail: moc. Abstract Cemento-ossifying fibromas are rare fibro-osseous benign neoplasms that affect the jaws.

They are included in the group of mesodermal odontogenic tumors and commonly present as a progressively growing lesion that might attain enormous size with resultant deformity, if left untreated.

A confusion prevails on the terminology, which can only be confirmed by histopathologic evaluation. A case of cemento-ossifying fibroma involving the right mandible is described in a 30 year-old female patient. The clinical, radiographic, histologic features are presented and the various differential diagnosis are discussed.

Cemento-ossifying fibroma COF is a distinct form of a benign fibro-osseous tumor, affecting predominantly the craniofacial region. Their resemblance to ossifying fibroma and cemento-osseous dysplasias give evidence for an odontogenic origin.

Cemento-ossifying fibroma has always been surrounded by controversy regarding the terminology and criteria of diagnosis. Even then, the differences between the broad spectrum of ossifying fibromas remains unclear. The following case report attempts to differentiate between lesions presenting with similar clinical, radiographic and histologic presentations; as well as describe the varying manifestations of COF, with reference to previous literature.

Case Report A 30 year old female patient with no other relevant medical history, reported to the department with a swelling on the right side of the face since the last 2 years with occasional pain Figure 1. The swelling seemed to be gradually increasing in size, reaching its present size in the last 6 months.

No history of previous similar swelling, toothache, or numbness could be elicited. Extra-oral examination revealed a well-defined, dome-shaped swelling extending over the right body of the mandible up to the lower border of the mandible inferiorly.

There was no erythema or surface ulceration of the swelling. On palpation, a bony hard consistency of the swelling was elicited, with no evident tenderness or increase in temperature. Expansion of the buccal cortical plate was evident. Intraorally, the swelling was observed in the lower buccal vestibule leading to obliteration of the mucobuccal fold with respect to lower right molars and measured approximately 3cm x 4cm in size.

Tooth mobility and mild tenderness on percussion was observed in the teeth associated with the lesion namely, lower right molars and root stump. Digital panoramic radiograph taken revealed a well-defined multilocular radiolucent lesion in the right mandibular body region extending up to the ramus Figure 2. The lesion was seen extending beyond the lower border of the mandible with expansion and thinning of the cortical plates. The internal structure of the lesion was mainly radiolucent, with diffuse scattered radiopacity.

Root resorption of lower right first and second molars was evident. Occlusal radiograph showed well-defined expansion of both the buccal and lingual cortical plates arising from lower right first molar region, with evidence of ill-defined diffuse septa, suggesting a multi-locular appearance with diffuse irregular radiopacity within the largely radiolucent lesion Figure 3.

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Cemento-ossifying fibroma of the mandible

Cemento-ossifying fibroma of the mandible A clinicopathological report Tapas K. E-mail: moc. Abstract Cemento-ossifying fibromas are rare fibro-osseous benign neoplasms that affect the jaws. They are included in the group of mesodermal odontogenic tumors and commonly present as a progressively growing lesion that might attain enormous size with resultant deformity, if left untreated. A confusion prevails on the terminology, which can only be confirmed by histopathologic evaluation.

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Peripheral ossifying fibroma

Fenrilabar Please review our privacy policy. Occasionally, they are identified in children, in which case they are a more aggressive variant and are known as juvenile aggressive cemento-ossifying fibromas discussed separately 3,5. Cemento — ossifying fibroma is a benign fibro-osseous- tumor. Management of peripheral ossifying fibroma. Case presentation A year-old male patient figure 1 A reported to the outpatient department with a large swelling on the left side of upper back tooth region.

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Cemento-ossifying fibroma

It is very closely related to other fibro-osseous lesions like fibrous dysplasia, cemental periapical dysplasia and other calcifying odontogenic cysts and tumour. We report a case of this entity along with differentiating radiographic features that set it apart from other fibro-osseous lesions. Background Menzel in first described ossifying fibroma. Cementifying fibroma is designated as a benign form of fibro-osseous lesions with well circumscribed, slow growing and sharply defined margins with a radiolucent peripheral component. This is reported commonly in women in the mandibular region but in this paper we summarise the clinical presentation of this rare entity in a male patient in the posterior maxillary region along with a review of literature. Case presentation A year-old male patient figure 1 A reported to the outpatient department with a large swelling on the left side of upper back tooth region. He first noted the swelling 1 year back but from last 4—5 months, the swelling has been growing which forced him to seek dental consultation.

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